MEMO: Tim Pawlenty is Not for Minnesota


TO: Interested Parties

FROM: The Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party

DATE: March 12, 2018

RE: Tim Pawlenty: Not for Minnesota

Before bothering to announce his candidacy for governor to the people of Minnesota, Tim Pawlenty has sent out invitations for a high-dollar fundraiser in Florida next week. This move is in line with Pawlenty’s history of giving preferential treatment to out-of-state donors, national conservatives, and the one percent at the expense of hardworking Minnesotans. Let’s take a look at that history:

Pawlenty left Minnesota in economic shambles, and then cashed-in to make millions lobbying for the very Wall Street banks that brought us the Great Recession.

As governor, Pawlenty raided every single pot of funds he could just so he could say he “never raised taxes” when he later ran for president

With his eye on national office, Pawlenty relied on these short-term budget band-aids even though they were devastating for working families.

To appease the far right during his presidential campaign, he flip-flopped on major issues and embraced positions that are out of touch with every day Minnesotans.

  • Climate Change. As climate change denial became a “litmus test for conservatives,” Pawlenty began questioning “how much climate change is man-made” despite his history of support for limiting greenhouse emissions.
  • Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid. While he originally said he wouldn’t “reduce” Medicare and Medicaid, Pawlenty later supported a Tea Party budget during his presidential campaign that would decimate both programs as well as social security. He also called for sweeping cuts to Social Security.
  • Ethanol Subsidies. As governor, Pawlenty supported subsidies for corn-based ethanol. As a presidential candidate, he came out in support of entirely scrapping them.

Rather than seeking donations from every day Americans, Pawlenty cozied up to the big banks to raise millions during his presidential run.

Pawlenty worked with the Financial Services Roundtable as they attempted to take away regulations that protect working Americans from corporate greed.

  • While Pawlenty was at the Financial Services Roundtable, the organization fought to allow banks to limit consumers’ right to sue banks for wrongdoing and delay a rule legally requiring that retirement account advisers act in their client’s best interests.

Now before even announcing his candidacy to the people who he hopes to represent, Pawlenty is selling tickets to a $500-per-plate fundraiser in Naples, Florida.

Filed under: DFL News